Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Botanical Brouhaha Expert Discussion Panel: Session 26

43elan flowerse

                                                                                                                                                                                   image via Elan Flowers

The Question:

Based on your experience, can you name a flower that should be avoided in hand-tied bouquets? Which flowers are your favorites for hand-tied bouquets?

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The Answers:

I love asclepias but I have started to avoid this bloom. The seeping milk like sap is potentially dangerous if it should get on your hands. If the liquid gets near the eyes the pain is debilitating. I love cabbage roses, peony, lilac, and I have found a new belief in poppies. Purchasing local poppies has made a huge difference in the quality of the bloom.

-Holly Chapple (Holly Heider Chapple Flowers)

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No flower specifically. I try to stick with seasonal flowers as much as possible. My favorites are anything local and unusual - clematis flower is a personal favorite this time of year.

-Clare Day (Clare Day Flowers)

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Flowers that don't hold up well in hand tied-bouquets in my experience:

Queen Anne's Lace

Maidenhair fern

Purple Hydrangea

White Anemones and Gardenia (they blow open and can get battered easily)

Favorite flowers for hand-tied bouquets:

Roses, any variety

Peonies

Ranunculus

Dahlias

textural details like Berries, Craspedia, Succulents, pods

I also ask my brides to keep their bouquets in water for as long as possible so they are looking fresh as she walks down the aisle.

-Elisabeth Zemetis (Blush Floral Design)

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For bridal bouquets the only flowers I would avoid are Oriental or Asiatic lilies. There is the pollen issue as well as the fact that the petals are so delicate. For gift bouquets I try to avoid using tulips unless the customer insists. Tulips continue to grow after they are cut and it means that after a few days in the vase our perfectly formed domed hand tied bouquets have tulips sticking out two or three inches above all the other flowers.

-Nick Priestly (Mood Flowers)

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I can't say there are any flowers I avoid 100% for bouquets, but there are some
flowers that take an extra step or two to condition them for bouquets. These
flowers include hyacinths, daffodils, paperwhites - they all produce a gooey
sap that could be a problem for a bride and her dress. If I plan to use any of
these flowers I give them a cut and place them in a glass vase where they can
let the sap run out. Then I use them in the bouquet. I do not cut them again or
the sap starts again. Also, tulips grow after being cut, so I always tuck them
in a bit knowing they will pop up out of the bouquet and may need to be pulled
back down.
My favorites are the tried and true flowers - roses, calla lilies, orchids,
ranunculus, anemones --- the ones that I know can take some summer heat!
I actually use hydrangeas a lot in bouquets, which I know a lot of designers are
fearful of. I just spend some extra time conditioning the hydrangeas and spray
heavily with crowning glory.

-Alicia Schwede (Bella Fiori)

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Unfortunately most of the flowers that I love struggle in bouquets!

A few that I try to avoid are:

Dinner plate dahlias- here they wilt as soon as they see the sun

Scabiosa- they droop fairly quickly

Dusty miller- they droop immediately in the dry heat of Utah

Snow on the mountain- they leak a milky substance that can give you a rash

Foraged wildflowers-they don't seem to last out of water

Any berries that are soft and will stain if squished

-Sarah Winward (Honey of a Thousand Flowers)

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Thanks Sarah, Alicia, Nick, Elisabeth, Clare & Holly!

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Some beautiful hand-tied bouquets…

0001px  OneLove Photography adn krsta jon

Krista Jon and One Love Phototgraphy 

005-466x700 The Nichols photo and stems austin

Stems and The Nichols 

5 (2) april flowers

April Flowers

8mckenzie powell and jasmine star photo

McKenzie Powell and Jasmine Star Photography 

013 fletcher and foley

Fletcher & Foley

078_art_deco_oakandowl$!400x  Josh Gruetzmacher Photography and oak and the owl

Oak and the Owl and Josh Gruetzmacher Photography

133erinkatephoto erinkatephoto.com and honey of a thousand flowers

Honey of a Thousand Flowers 

1170_590408034337958_1215384040_n amy osaba

Amy Osaba 

5403_10151582563098745_433053934_n apryl ann photo and bows and arrows

Bows and Arrows and Apryl Ann Photography 

5777_598221873543206_1394967854_n love n fresh

Love ‘n Fresh Flowers 

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Feel free to chime in and share your favorites and non-favorites for hand-tied bouquets! The more we share, the more we benefit…

Have a great Wednesday!

2 comments:

K. Barber-Flower Farmer said...

Great info, I was just talking to another florist about this. I have had a hard time being new to this finding info on the best and worst flowers for bridal bouquets. Thanks to all that shared.

Laurie (Fleurie) said...

On those flowers and foliage that are wilt prone, I tuck them into the inner part of the bouquet so that if they do wilt, they are supported by the others surrounding it. My pet peeve is seeing bouquets that are wilted in photos.
I can't take that chance in my area, it gets too hot! I also recommend that the bouquet is kept in water as often and as long as possible